ACM Creativity & Cognition 2013 WS: What Actually is Interaction?

“What Actually is Interaction? When Does it Start and Where Does It
End?”
(http://www.onnai.com/workshops/cc2013_workshop_interaction/)

A workshop at ACM Creativity & Cognition 2013
(http://cc13.creativityandcognition.com/)

Sydney, Australia on 17 June 2013 (Monday)

Organisers
Kirsty Boyle, Creative Robotics Laboratory, University of New South
Wales, Australia
Christopher Lueg, Computing & Information Systems, University of
Tasmania, Australia

Confirmed Keynote speakers
Professor Catherine Stevens
Research Program Leader of Music Cognition and Action at the MARCS
Institute, University of Western Sydney
Associate Professor Mari Velonaki
Director of the Creative Robotics Lab, at the National Institute of
Experimental Arts, University of New South Wales.

Workshop topic
Interaction is being explored from a range of different perspectives,
including a renewed interest in embodied cognition. There are
cognitive and embodied aspects to any kind of interaction but
depending on the disciplinary background, interaction may mean very
different things to different people. In this workshop we are
interested in sharing conceptualisations of interaction across
disciplinary boundaries (eg human computer interaction, information
science, cognitive science, biology, visual and performing arts, fine
arts, robotics) and learning from each other as to how to value and
e-value-ate “interaction”. By examining situated cognition and
embodiment theory in practice, we hope to identify key issues and
provide a roadmap for future research which crosses disciplinary
boundaries.

In this workshop we are interested in sharing conceptualisations of
interaction across disciplinary boundaries (eg human computer
interaction, information science, cognitive science, biology, visual
and performing arts, fine arts, robotics) and learning from each other
as to how to assess and evaluate “interaction”. By examining situated
cognition and embodiment theory in practice, we hope to identify key
issues and provide a roadmap for future research which crosses
disciplinary boundaries.

Call for submissions

We ask prospective participants to submit a 4-page position paper
addressing a topic relevant to the theme of the workshop and/or a
2-page personal statement describing their research, current
interests, questions as relevant to the workshop. Personal statements
should be used to explain the potential relevance of the participant’s
work for the workshop, what they can offer and the relevance of the
workshop for their work.

Submitted papers will be selected on the basis of their relevance,
quality and ability to stimulate discussion. Upon request we will
organize peer-reviewing of full written papers. The organisers will
explore options for publishing the papers in a journal special issue.
All submissions should be sent directly to the organisers
(christopher.lueg@utas.edu.au) in PDF format using the SIGCHI template
files located at http://www.sigchi.org/publications/chipubform.

Important Dates

10 May 2013 (extended) – Paper submission deadline
17 May 2013 – Notification of acceptance
24 May 2013 – Camera ready submission
17 June 2013 – Workshop in Sydney

Venue

The workshop will take place within the
Creative Robotics Laboratory
National Institute for Experimental Arts (NIEA) University of New
South Wales (COFA)
Cnr of Oxford St and Greens Rd
Paddington, NSW 2021.

Workshop Program – 17 June 2013

The full-day program consists of two parts.
In the morning invited Keynote presentations will focus on discussing
theoretical aspects of embodiment, behavior and perception, and what
it means for interaction. What actually is “interaction” and when do
we call it interaction?

In the afternoon we will focus on putting the insights into practice
by discussing examples provided by participants. “Setting the stage”
will be followed by 5- 10 min presentations by attendees. The focus is
on making people think, not on ‘formal’ paper presentations.
Participants are explicitly encouraged to bring props that can be used
to illustrate a point.

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